Plain Brown Cardboard

Who doesn't like Carl Weathers?

57 notes

gilliananderson1996:

Back in school we used to dream about this everydayCould it really happen? Or do dreams just fade awayThen we started singin’ and they said it sounded smoothSo we started a group and here we arekickin’ it just for you

Do you ever have that thing where you can no longer tell if your interest in vintage organs is semi-comedic or totally earnest? That is how I feel about 90s Gillian Anderson/David Duchovny.

gilliananderson1996:

Back in school we used to dream about this everyday
Could it really happen? 
Or do dreams just fade away
Then we started singin’ and they said it sounded smooth
So we started a group and here we are
kickin’ it just for you

Do you ever have that thing where you can no longer tell if your interest in vintage organs is semi-comedic or totally earnest? That is how I feel about 90s Gillian Anderson/David Duchovny.

Filed under so many trench coats

42 notes

Anonymous asked: Gail, I'd love your advice on this. Say an artist has spent years trying to break in and is finally approached by a company to do some work, but it's a company that produces work that is rather... sleazy. Should that artist use that opportunity to get work published, despite being uncomfortable with the content (maybe try to improve it if they can?) or stick to their guns and hope that another opportunity comes along that is more tasteful?

gailsimone:

This is actually a choice artists of all stripes have to make, not just once, but endlessly, for their entire careers, most likely.

It used to be worse, when there were fewer methods of getting your message heard without corporate backing.

The truth is, a LOT of having a career in comics is that first foot in the door. So your first step in, your first comic you can hand a potential editor, these things are huge, and almost certainly necessary.

The thing that is hard to realize is that almost almost all the artists we think of as having the most integrity, we still only heard of them in the first place because they worked with some huge corporation, and few such organizations are without sin. 

My thinking was always that I wanted there to be more characters in the superhero universes I loved that young girls could relate to, that was at the heart of my early choices. I did want to make changes (I thought I would be lucky if I was able to add one or two new characters for girls), and I needed to be at DC or Marvel for that. This sounds pretty calculated, like I had a plan. I didn’t, I just had a dream that sort of came true.

Anyway, once I was in and started going to cons, my goals got a lot bigger. And I think I have been able to make some changes. 

It’s rarely a choice of good or bad wholly, it’s usually more a matter of degrees. A lot of people broke in doing work they weren’t exactly proud of, for others, that is simply not an option.

You are going to have to make that call. I made it pretty clear early on that there were things I wouldn’t write, even if I had to quit a book, and I have stuck to that. But I was very fortunate breaking in and I don’t want to judge others for their choices in pursuing their dream.

Do remember, however, that once you have something in print, it is attached to you for a long, long time. When you make a bad choice, it doesn’t always go away easily.

I really don’t want to tell you what to do. But if you feel this opportunity is important, I would say try to make their weakness your strength. Embrace the fun side of ‘sleazy,’ if possible, turn it to something positive, if you can. I don’t know the context, but there is definitely a need for unseemly and unsavory comics that appeal to more people than the current stuff out there.

Good luck!

From my own experience, I think it can be (sorry I am about to use this phrase) damaging to your soul as an artist to agree to do work you know is not your jam specifically for people you know in advance are shady.

If you already have a bad feeling about them, listen to it. People like this usually don’t just want the work for free or cheap, they also inevitably treat artists poorly - they don’t respect their work or their ideas.

And that can really shut you down, creatively, I think because you are affirming with your work to your own brain “I am basically not worth treating well as an artist”, and that way lies MADNESS, ask me how I know.

Keep believing in yourself and your work, and opportunities that are a better fit for you will come, and you won’t have wasted a bunch of time and energy untangling yourself after working with buffoons who give you notes like “Can the hero be 15% more likeable when we meet him”.

1,165 notes

maxofs2d:

thank you for your insight on why the video game community is totally not sexist, alex mahan

Do you ever have that feeling where you’re like - why can’t evil people be less fucking pedestrian about it.

I mean FUCK ME this is some dull 80s teen movie meathead villain bullshit. “LA Video Game Babes Examiner”.

ALEX MAHAN. YOU HAVE FAILED THIS CITY.

(Source: examiner.com, via dudefella)

64 notes

tinyhousedesign:

New Post has been published on http://www.tinyhouseliving.com/tumbleweed-cypress-24-tour/

Tumbleweed Cypress 24 Tour


// 

In the video Steve Weissmann from Tumbleweed Tiny House Company give us a tour of one of the larger tiny homes out there – at 172 square feet.
It’s 24-feet long, has a comfortable loft, space for a twin bed downstairs, functional kitchen, and is built on top of a custom 3-axle trailer. For those looking to buy and not build, Tumbleweeds can be financed too.
To learn more visit the Tumbleweed Tiny House Company website.
 

// 

Subscribe to Tiny House Design 


I have so many escape fantasies centered on tiny houses.

tinyhousedesign:

New Post has been published on http://www.tinyhouseliving.com/tumbleweed-cypress-24-tour/

Tumbleweed Cypress 24 Tour

image

In the video Steve Weissmann from Tumbleweed Tiny House Company give us a tour of one of the larger tiny homes out there – at 172 square feet.

It’s 24-feet long, has a comfortable loft, space for a twin bed downstairs, functional kitchen, and is built on top of a custom 3-axle trailer. For those looking to buy and not build, Tumbleweeds can be financed too.

To learn more visit the Tumbleweed Tiny House Company website.

Tumbleweed Cypress 24 - Kitchen Tumbleweed Cypress 24 - InteriorTumbleweed Cypress 24 - Stairs with DrawersTumbleweed Cypress 24 - BathroomTumbleweed Cypress 24 - Loft

Subscribe to Tiny House Design

I have so many escape fantasies centered on tiny houses.

138,667 notes

puckish-thoughts:

THERE IT IS AGAIN!  THERE IT FUCKING IS!  i’VE BEEN TALKING ABOUT THIS PHOTO FOR YEARS AND NEVER COULD FIND IT!!  THE LAN PARTY WITH THE GUY DUCT-TAPED TO THE CEILING!!  BACK IN ANCIENT TIMES WHEN PEOPLE STILL USED CATHODE MONITORS AND WHEN COUNTERSTRIKE WAS THE NEW THING.  THIS SHIT IS REAL.  THIS IS REAL SHIT.  SHIT THAT HAPPENED.

puckish-thoughts:

THERE IT IS AGAIN!  THERE IT FUCKING IS!  i’VE BEEN TALKING ABOUT THIS PHOTO FOR YEARS AND NEVER COULD FIND IT!!  THE LAN PARTY WITH THE GUY DUCT-TAPED TO THE CEILING!!  BACK IN ANCIENT TIMES WHEN PEOPLE STILL USED CATHODE MONITORS AND WHEN COUNTERSTRIKE WAS THE NEW THING.  THIS SHIT IS REAL.  THIS IS REAL SHIT.  SHIT THAT HAPPENED.

(Source: unregistered-hypercam2, via patheticjunkies)

5,456 notes

The End of Gamers

dudefella:

dangolding:

The last few weeks in videogame culture have seen a level of combativeness more marked and bitter than any beforehand.

First, a developer—a woman who makes games who has had so much piled on to her that I don’t want to perpetuate things by naming her—was the target of a…

So sick of gamer “culture.”

This is a really good piece that makes me feel hopeful. (Mildly hopeful, but still.)

54,428 notes

itriedthatonceitwasabadmove:

basileus-omniworks:

misha-bawlins:

This drink I like it. Another!

I love how quickly he readjusts to the culture so foreign to him. Like, he does not even protest or try to explain this is how it’s done in Asgard so it’s how it SHOULD be done because he’s a mighty god and stuff. He’s just like “but I… oh I see smashing mugs is not a custom here. I’m sorry I won’t do it again :( “

A lot of people could learn from this.

^ How to be a traveler and not a tourist

I like that he clearly finds the “no smashing” rule to be ridiculous and backward, but he’s willing to humor us in our strange little superstition.

(Source: maxmff, via intrepidgirlblogger)